In Sweden, There’s No COVID-19 Lockdown. Here Are 4 Things to Know.

 
 
Apr 15, 2020
 

Good morning from Washington, where President Trump announces a new panel to advise him on reopening the economy, including Heritage Foundation President Kay C. James. Plus, he declares a suspension of U.S. funding for the World Health Organization over its mishandling of the coronavirus outbreak. Fred Lucas reports on that as well as on Sweden's more relaxed approach to COVID-19. On the podcast, a Georgia man recounts what it was like to get the disease. Plus: Michigan's governor takes fire for her measures, the U.S. military adjusts in Europe, and the real legacy of Phyllis Schlafly. On this date in 1865, President Abraham Lincoln dies at 7:22 a.m. from a bullet wound inflicted the night before by Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.

 
 
 
News
Photo
By Fred Lucas

After logging over 1,000 COVID-19 deaths, Sweden has faced a rash of criticism for having perhaps the least restrictive rules in the world regarding social distancing, as restaurants and bars and some schools remain open while staying at home is urged but not mandated.
Commentary
Photo
By Brett Schaefer

Instead of ending funding during the current crisis, the U.S. should condition future funding to specific actions by the World Health Organization.
News
Photo
By Fred Lucas

"Our countries are now experiencing—look all over the world—tremendous death and economic devastation because those tasked with protecting us by being truthful and transparent failed to do so," says President Trump.
Analysis
Photo
By Rachel del Guidice

"I started having a fever and just started not feeling good. … I had a fever for 12 days straight [and] I've never had that before," says Kevin Weinrich.
News
Photo
By Nolan Peterson

So far, experts agree that NATO has sent the right message and Russia's attempts to exploit the pandemic to its advantage, such as by sending medical supplies to Italy, have not splintered the alliance's solidarity.
News
Photo
By Rachel del Guidice

Whitmer made it illegal to visit other homes, such as a neighbor's residence and vacation homes, and required large businesses to shut off parts of their stores selling nonessential goods.
Commentary
Photo
By Lee Edwards

Phyllis Schlafly was one of the most influential women of the second half of the 20th century. But the great conservative woman's reputation may be targeted in a new miniseries, "Mrs. America."
 
     
 
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